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Fast Company just published my latest post on medical hotspotting on the Fast Company Co-Exist blog. Here’s a snip; follow the link to read more.

Medical hotspotting traces its roots to a law enforcement strategy that involves mapping where crimes are committed in a given region and then applying extra police resources in areas considered hot spots. Advocated by former New York Police Commissioner William Bratton in the mid-1990s, the approach was credited as an important element in reducing crime in New York City by 60%.

A happy and healthy Thanksgiving to all – see you back here next week.

Bryce

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Harvard law professor Einer Elhauge put up this OpEd yesterday in the New York Times outlining an interesting argument for the constitutionality of the ACA’s individual mandate clause. Here’s a snip:

But the argument that the commerce clause does not authorize the insurance mandate is beside the point. The mandate is clearly authorized by the “necessary and proper clause,” which the Supreme Court has held gives Congress the power to pass any law that is “rationally related” to the execution of some constitutional power.

I’ve argued before that the law can work without the individual mandate, given the right conditions including annual enrollment periods, affordable, standardized plans and guaranteed issue among others. I’m looking forward to hearing the arguments on both sides as the Supreme Court date gets closer.

Read my latest post for Fast Company on the opportunity health care reform offers insurance companies to compete for new customers. Can insurers adapt quickly enough to take advantage of this tremendous market opportunity? To find out, read “Can Health Insurance Become Customer-Friendly And Web-Savvy?